Posts Tagged ‘chinese silk embroidered pictures’

Chinese Silk Embroidered

Chinese Silk Embroidered Reviews


Wrapables Silk Embroidered Brocade Gift Jewelry Coin Pouch Purse (Set of 8)


Wrapables Silk Embroidered Brocade Gift Jewelry Coin Pouch Purse (Set of 8)


$11.95


These vibrant silk pouches are beautifully crafted and have many uses. Each pouch features elegant silk embroidered Asian motifs that symbolize, luck, love, prosperity, and longevity. They can be used to store small items such as coins, jewelry, and trinkets. The pouches also make great gifts and stocking stuffers; use them as containers for giving cash, gift cards, checks, and other small items. …

Wrapables Large Silk Embroidered Jewelry Rolls, Light Purple


Wrapables Large Silk Embroidered Jewelry Rolls, Light Purple


$13.95


Store your jewelry with our Silk Embroidered Jewelry Rolls. These rolls have a beautiful floral design on the outside and consists of three zippered pockets, a ring strap, and a bigger pocket for more storage, on the inside. Safely take your jewelry with you while you are traveling by placing them within the roll and go!…







Chinese Embroidery


Chinese Embroidery


$9.99


Influenced by mythology and religious beliefs, Chinese embroidered textiles are often admired for their intricate patterning, silken and golden threads, and traditional motifs. Chinese Embroidery: Traditional Techniques traces the history of this ancient craft comprised of stunning animals, birds, butterflies, flowers, and figures, and presents readers with the necessary tools, techniques, and fab…

The Pilgrim Art: Cultures of Porcelain in World History


The Pilgrim Art: Cultures of Porcelain in World History


$11.80


Illuminating one thousand years of history, The Pilgrim Art explores the remarkable cultural influence of Chinese porcelain around the globe. Cobalt ore was shipped from Persia to China in the fourteenth century, where it was used to decorate porcelain for Muslims in Southeast Asia, India, Persia, and Iraq. Spanish galleons delivered porcelain to Peru and Mexico while aristocrats in Europe ordered…

China: Through the Looking Glass


China: Through the Looking Glass


$28.70


For centuries, China’s export arts—jade, silks, porcelains, and, more recently, cinema—have fueled Western fantasies of an exotic East and served as enduring sources of inspiration for fashion. This stunning publication explores the influence of Chinese aesthetics on designers, including Giorgio Armani, Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Karl Lagerfeld, Ralph Lauren, Alexander McQueen, and …







Mens Robe Chinese Dragon Pattern Kimono Bathrobe with Waistband


Mens Robe Chinese Dragon Pattern Kimono Bathrobe with Waistband



Completely reversible unisex Chinese dragon robe. Decorated beautifully with a Chinese design on the outside, reverse it and you’ve got a solid black robe with a magnificent Chinese dragon embroidered on the back. Made from polyester. Superior quality. Washing Instructions: Wash in cool water with like colors. Dry on low heat only. Sizing Recommendations: Shoulder 24″——Bust 48″—–Length …


GoodOrient Women's Embroidered Thai Silk Chinese Clothing


GoodOrient Women’s Embroidered Thai Silk Chinese Clothing



Burgundy Embroidered Thai Silk blouse is designed in a Chinese style High Style Collar with long v-neck styleOn the front side, you will see that three pipa-shaped handmade frog buttons. Covering the body down to the hip.Size from 2 to 16….








Chinese Silk Embroidered

The voice of silk

Watch your tie. Or curtains, tablecloths, wallpaper, a summer blouse …
Watch the fabric and decoration drawing it. It is not embroidered: it is printed.
So far, everything is trivial. What is not trivial is the story behind the procedure to actually do the printing, and ensure that when your tie is stained, the color of the stain is removed by washing, but the decorations are bright and clear. A story that we have chosen an exceptional storyteller, someone who has been building machines for printing textiles for more than sixty years: MS Italy.

The history of textile printing begins, as far as we know, nearly two thousand years ago, China, with scraps of silk flowers painted in three colors, around 200 AD, and reached the Mediterranean, Egypt, as two hundred years later. But Asia will anyway remain the undisputed master of textile printing for several centuries, with Indian silks and Chinese considered as objects of great value in European markets. These printed fabrics are obtained with carved wooden blocks used as stamps and thus pressed when dipped in color on the canvas. Efficient Technology never remains the same spot, and it is in the Middle Ages that we find the first examples of printing similar textile made in Europe, although on fabrics, particularly with dyes of much lower quality, which are an obstacle to dissemination large market that washing the printed fabric is impossible, for fear that the colors run. This limits its application to tapestries and other decorative objects, which does not require washing.

This situation will last for several centuries: it will be the French who finally back to their country of origin their Indian colonies, the techniques of printing on fabrics that are resistant to washing, but not before the late seventeenth century. Just a few decades later, there will be no European country left where textiles are not printed.
But there is still a long way to go: that these beautiful printed fabrics are, they require too long to do, and the superb skill in aligning the Tripitaka printing after printing, so that uninterrupted imperfections appear in the figure. This invention makes Thomas Bell in 1785, a true revolution: it is a printing machine based on cylinders (a show that we are familiar, but a completely new and unique for the time) through which the fabric is pushed during printing with the pattern engraved on the bottles themselves. In addition to allowing for highly accurate and detailed graphics, in a maximum of six colors (an extraordinary achievement in itself), the machine Bell conquers the field for his astonishing speed: in a workday of ten hours, it can print in one color of about ten thousand meters of fabric. This is the passage from the perspective of a craftsman of an industry, as a Functionally and economically. And an industry that is becoming increasingly demanding, both in the early twentieth century a new technology, a still largely used, is developed: that of the screen, where color is pressed onto the fabric through silk screens pre-treated, and composing the final image on the canvas.

Our guide in this journey through the centuries also tells us the latest technology, the MS is specialized in Italy as a manufacturer of the machine: that of digital textile printing. Exactly as in the passage of the offset printing digital printing for paper, textile digital printing technology has enabled real revolution both in terms of cost (no need for screens specialized for each position, it is economical to print, even in low) and an ecological point of view (no special solvents and reagents, which are essential in the screen and highly polluting, are required)

And we can continue to enjoy our beautiful colored tie!

Can I find a pattern to sew a Chinese jacket, especially with Mandarin collar and asymmetrical hem?

I need sewing patterns or patrons for something like these jackets or blouses .. I searched for them, I find these jackets coat jacket called Tang I want to know more about Chinese customs and clothing and sewing hope one of these jackets http://www.goodorient.com/Purple_Red_Silk_Brocade_Jacket_P27433 detailed http:/ # / # Www.goodorient.com/Asymmetric_Longevity_Jacket_P17087 detailed http://www.eaststore.com/catalog/product_506_Peony_Embroidered_Silk_Crepe_Blouse_cat_1.html

First two links are dead, one third has a shawl collar shape does look to it, not Mandarin. If you want to know how the pass, take a look at Butterick 5336. The base of the bodice is a shoulder princess with a little ease, designed as a wrap front with front opening and shaped hem. You should be able to get an armhole princess dress, too, or two darts base. Mandarin Collar Dr. No: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_No